How Much Is Your Resume Worth? – Part 1

resume-reviewer

Have you ever considered how much your resume is worth?  Put an actual dollar value on it?  I sometimes ask people seeking resume help how much they think their two-page resume is worth (hopefully their resume is only two pages and not the 10+ I’ve seen).  I get answers from five cents to “a lot,” but the right answer is: it depends on how much I make.  If I earn $100,000 every year for the next ten years, these two pages are worth $1,000,000 dollars to me.  Think about that for a second.  The resume I thought of as a burden to create and update, which I worked on while watching The Big Bang Theory or Game of Thrones, is possibly worth $1mm or more to me.  What other documents have you recently created worth $1mm+ to you?

While your resume is far from the only factor in getting a job, it is your gateway into getting the interview.  Malcolm Gladwell describes in his book “Blink” how people, especially interviewers, make snap judgments.  When you first meet someone and shake their hand, you make a snap judgment about that person.  A strong handshake might indicate a smart and put together individual or a weak handshake might indicate a timid and unmotivated individual.  The interviewer sub-consciously continues to reinforce that initial judgment through out the discussion.  For example,

“Do you know Java?” the interviewer asks.

You reply, “No, but I read a lot and can quickly learn.”

If the interviewer snap judged they don’t like you, they sub-consciously think, “Hmm, doesn’t seem to have the right skills.  No hire.”  If the interviewer snap judged they like you, they sub-consciously think, “Wow, seems to have a real can do attitude and has great potential.  Hire!”  The very first snap judgment a hiring manager makes about you is based on your resume.

A well organized, easy to read, and error free resume indicates an intelligent and well-organized individual.  A sloppy, dense, or error-filled resume indicates a lazy and “lacks attention to detail” individual.

That is why we said, let’s build something that helps people build the best resume possible, create a great first impression, and get them the right job: The Resume Reviewer.

To Be Continued in Part 2: Building the Resume Reviewer where we’ll get into the tech detail!

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New 127.0.0.1 Sweet 127.0.0.1

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“There’s no place like home.”

– Dorothy (The Wizard of Oz)

For the past year we have been diligently planning and awaiting our move to a new home…and at last this week it has happened! Through just a little blood, sweet, and tears (those ethernet cables can be sharp), we successfully moved to our new lair.

Although we will miss our old home with all our unique LADDERS memories, I don’t think anybody will disagree if I say we are already thoroughly enjoying the perks of the new home.

Like….

The VIEW!!!

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Our new stylish elevator that works at the speed of light (our old elevators we’re definitely sub-light speed)!

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Our Cafe area where we get breakfast, lunch and dinner every day of the week!

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And of course our working space

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The move was smooth sailing, at least for us inhabitants. Fill your moving crate the Friday before at the old office and find your desk ready to work at Monday morning. Easy right? However, the team who facilitated the move probably has a completely different story to tell. I’m almost sure that our head of HR Luis Rodriguez and our master Enterprise Architect Marque Staneluis, who lead our move and made it seem easy (which it wasn’t), acquired a few gray hairs in the process…but they would agree it was well worth it.

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“Hopefully you didn’t notice, but this move was Murphy’s Law on steroids!”

-Marque Staneluis

 

Thankfully they didn’t have to do it alone.

They had the power team of Khoa Chau (KC), Jose Diaz, Michael Andersen, Nick Giordano, and of course Jose Perez and Diego Riano.

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But at the end, all the hard work paid off. The move was a huge success.

And what do we do when we succeed at LADDERS? We of course celebrate!!!

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Cheers!

Ozlem Zoe Gul, Director of Engineering @ LADDERS

Why You Should Let Your Best Employees Join Another Team

Another Team

Imagine a fantastic software engineer who’s been working for the same team on the same system for a few years. Before long, she gets promoted. Her colleagues and direct reports love her, but despite getting more responsibilities, she’s growing tired of the same set of technical challenges.

A team is being put together elsewhere in the company in order to build a new system, and she has her eye on that. So she decides to approach her manager about it.

WHY INTERNAL TRANSFERS ARE SO RARE

At many companies, this type of request isn’t greeted too enthusiastically. Plenty of organizations have official policies on internal transfers, but they’re seldom utilized as much as they could be. I once had a manager who would say that a team member of theirs “quit” when they transferred, and actually tried to prevent that from happening. A colleague of mine says he once got scolded by a manager who found out he was using the internal jobs site, and was then “forgiven.” In these situations, company culture undermines company policy.

PLENTY OF ORGANIZATIONS HAVE OFFICIAL POLICIES ON INTERNAL TRANSFERS, BUT THEY’RE SELDOM UTILIZED AS MUCH AS THEY COULD BE.

Explicitly or implicitly, when the opportunity to apply your skills in a different part of the company is discouraged, you’re more likely to jump ship altogether.

For managers, though, it comes down to weighing the costs and benefits. If you discourage or outright reject the transfer request and keep that team member on board, you will:

  • Have a demotivated and unhappy employee on your hands.
  • Deliver a clear message to the rest of your team that there’s no leaving this group; there’s only leaving the company.
  • Eventually—usually within six months—be handed a resignation letter.

If you say yes, you’ll no longer have the great employee on your team, but will:

  • Have the opportunity to negotiate when they can transfer (e.g. one or two months, which is far better than two weeks’ notice), so you’ll have enough time to recruit the right replacement and bring them fully up to speed.
  • Deliver a clear message to the rest of your team that you can have a career here and not just a job.
  • Retain a talented and happy employee who keeps using their expertise on behalf of the company.

GIVE THE GIFT OF GROWTH

Some companies actually excel at letting their top employees move around within the organization in order to develop their skills. GE, for instance, has been known to approach top performers who’ve been in their roles for around one-and-a-half to two years and ask about their next position in the company. The point is to get the best people to stick with GE for the long haul and develop a career there.

For employees, the question is when, whether, and how to ask managers about the possibility of transferring to another team. Some companies don’t require you to do that, but some do. Regardless, those conversations should happen, and managers should encourage them. The ideal manager should be a partner to employees, not someone to hide from. Interest in working elsewhere within the company should never be a dirty secret or interpreted as a critique of a manager’s leadership style.

EMPLOYEES WHOSE CAREERS YOU’VE HELPED ADVANCE WILL REMEMBER THAT

Personally, I’ve had two people approach me about transferring to other groups during the past six months. One person wanted to increase the breadth of their experience, and the other wanted to be in the group focused on services (back end is their passion). Both of those employees brought a lot to my team. But after talking it out with them individually, I said yes to both. I knew they’d be able to grow and follow their passions, and it was my job to encourage that.

Sometimes managers are in a tough spot. What should you do if you’d like to help your employees grow in a different part of the company, but the organization frowns on that? Some managers’ judgment will be questioned if they let top performers leave. That risk is real, but it’s better to err on the side of doing right by your employees.

If you do, you’ll ultimately be doing right by your company, too—even if it isn’t exactly seen that way. The reality is that people now change their employers more often than ever, so minimizing that churn can be a good thing. What’s more, employees whose careers you’ve helped advance will remember that. You may be losing someone great now, but they might come back into your professional life sooner than you’d expect.

Post originally appeared in Fast Company.

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