Fighting the Dreaded Drive-By

drive

Here Comes the Drive-By

A drive-by is an immediate demand of your attention. In today’s modern office a drive-by can take many forms. A co-worker walks up to your desk to ask you a question, or sends you multiple yo’s in Slack, or spams your handle in a public channel, or waits to catch your eye and then waves for you to come look at something on their screen.

Drive-by’s are usually innocent and followed by phrases like “I’m sorry, are you busy? I can come back later.” The person breaking your focus isn’t trying to be malicious. They need your help. Don’t you want to be a helpful coworker, be a team player?

What’s So Bad About a Few Drive-By’s?

A lot! If you are a software engineer, or really anyone that needs deep focus and a large memory cache while working, you know why drive-by’s are bad. It takes a long time to load information back into your brain — most studies find it to be over fifteen minutes. Have you ever had a day where you felt like you got nothing done? Of course! I’d wager, the number of unscheduled interruptions on those days is pretty high.

Don’t Be the Drive-By

You can start fixing the problem by fixing your own behavior. Here are a few rules I follow to make sure I commit as few drive-by’s as possible.

  • Always message people before stopping by their desk. Try to keep it as a single message, 4 slack notifications for this request can be just as bad.
    Yo,
    I have a question
    It’s about that module you just added
    Mind if I stop by your desk?
  • If people are offline, assume they don’t want to be bothered. If you are at your desk and can handle messages, be online. If you are never online, it makes people less likely to follow this rule.
  • Only use @here or @handle in Slack (if you’re not using Slack, make step 1 use Slack) when something is urgent.
  • Use the daily stand up to ask questions. Stand up is your chance to share everything that someone might ask you that day. Be proactive. Take note of the types of questions you get asked throughout the day. Could you have addressed any of those questions in standup?

Becoming Drive-By Proof

Drive-by’s will happen and are impossible to eradicate. These are some of the ways I protect myself against them.

  • TDD (Test Driven Development) and Stubbing: Use a test as an anchor to help you find your place again and reload your mental stack. Did you just make a test go green before the disturbance? What did you stub? Stubs are a great way to keep track of what still needs to be done. Have all your stubs been implemented? You are ready to move on to your next requirement.
  • Requirements: Hopefully you have a clear set of requirements. My favorite stories have long lists of requirements. I use (/) in Jira to check off each one as it’s completed. If your stories don’t have a requirements list, take the time to convert the requirements to an actionable list. It will almost always pay off.
  • Mental Notes: If someone interrupts you, take a minute to make a mental note of what you were doing and what you need to do once you resume. Even better, write it down. This has two benefits: First, it lets you store your mental cache, which hopefully helps getting back in the flow easier once you resume. Second, if you make this your routine, coworkers will understand they won’t get an immediate response from you and will have to wait before asking you a question. This might make them more likely to try other sources before interrupting you.
  • Central Repository of Information: If people know you are only going to tell them to look it up in Confluence, they will stop asking. If you are asked a question, take the time to put your answer into the repo. This can also be a good exercise for the question asker, but make sure what they create is clear and complete.
  • Headphones are Key: Luckily I can code well while listening to music. This isn’t true for all engineers. I’ve known engineers that wear headphones with no music playing. This is an unfortunate last resort and usually comes across pretty passive aggressive.
  • Progress Reports: Hopefully you don’t need to check in with the team more often than stand up. For some highly coordinated tasks, you need to work closely with other team members. Make sure to announce your progress as you hit milestones and more importantly are in a good mental state to pause. Taking this initiative makes you less likely to be interrupted by questions like “Can I start working on X, did you finish Y?”

Epilogue

Clearly most of these suggestions are overhead and less necessary if you aren’t interrupted very often. There is no better solution than no interruptions!

TLDR: Only interrupt people when truly necessary. Break tasks into small manageable chunks and keep a list of completed and to-dos. Before you are fully interrupted, unload your mental cache into a short note.

Want to dig into this topic more? http://blog.ninlabs.com/2013/01/programmer-interrupted/ is a great article that really digs into some of the topics covered here and provides links to the full studies.

Have any other tips for preventing drive-by’s or resuming work after an interruption? Let us know in the comments.

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